Social Work (SOWK)

SOWK 300 Social Work Foundations

This course introduces perspective social work students to basic foundational concepts and methods of the social work profession. Students will examine the historical foundations and current context of social work. The course will analyze the different factors and perspectives such as social justice, poverty and populations that are at risk. Areas of professional social work services will be evaluated such as family and children’s services, mental health, health care, aging and the criminal justice system. Future social work challenges and trends will be assessed. 3 credits.

SOWK 302 Interview and Assessment Skills in Social Work

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 300.

This course introduces students to basic interview and assessment skills utilized in social work. Students will practice interpersonal communication skills, assessment strategies, and explore the dynamics of the helping relationship. Students will examine social and cultural influences, theories, and diversity issues related to the interview and assessment process. Students will evaluate communication and assessment skills used in the interview and assessment process. 3 credits.

SOWK 303 Diversity and Justice in a Global Society

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 300.

This course will focus on diverse populations in American society and on an international level. We will examine ways historical and contemporary patterns of oppression and discrimination may influence social work practice. Specific attention is given to professional commitments to marginalized groups and processes of advocacy, coalition-building, and other ways of developing effective alliances to promote social justice. 3 credits.

SOWK 304 Social Welfare

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 300.

This course examines social welfare issues from an historical perspective. Students are introduced to the origins of the welfare state, the development of the social welfare system, and the evolution of the social work profession. Social welfare issues, such as poverty, discrimination, employment, and criminal justice, are explored in terms of their social, ideological, political, and economic context. Particular emphasis is given to oppressed and vulnerable populations and the role of social workers as advocates in addressing social welfare issues. 3 credits.

SOWK 306 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I: Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 300.

This course is the first of a two-course sequence on the interaction of human behavior and the social environment across the lifespan. Students will examine interdisciplinary theories of human behavior and evaluate the “goodness-of-fit” between individuals and their environment during early life stages. The role of social workers as advocates for infants, children, and adolescents will also be explored. 3 credits.

SOWK 307 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II: Adulthood & Aging

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 300.

Prerequisite: SOWK 306.

This course is the second of a two-course sequence on the interaction of human behavior and the social environment across the lifespan. Students will examine interdisciplinary theories of human behavior and evaluate the “goodness-of-fit” between individuals and their environment during later life stages. The role of social workers as advocates for adults and the elderly will also be explored. 3 credits.

SOWK 309 Introduction to Social Work Research

This course introduces students to basic research concepts and methods with particular emphasis on the application of research to social work issues. Students examine the process of conducting research and compare different research methodologies to understand social work issues. Social work values and ethics are explored as they apply to conducting research. Diversity and unique populations are considered in the decision of research topics, subjects, and methodologies. Research studies and findings are evaluated as they apply to practice situations. The issue of research-informed practice and practice-informed research is explored. 3 credits.

SOWK 391 Youth At Risk

This course will introduce students to various models, theories, and intervention of children and adolescents considered "at-risk". Topics covered include, but may not be limited to the following: a) socio-cultural factors in defining and influencing behavior; b) psychological models both biological and ecological that interact to shape behavior; c) types of at-risk categories including school dropouts, substance use and addiction, teenage pregnancy, antisocial behavior, delinquency, gangs, school shooters, and youth suicide; and d) specific types of clinical abnormal behavior including anxiety, mood, and impulse control disorders; e) theoretical and practical considerations related to community and school interventions. 3 credits.

SOWK 393 Child Abuse

An introduction to and overview of the phenomena of child abuse as it relates to the helping professional. This class will examine the definition and cause of child abuse from sociological, cultural, and psychological perspectives. The legal and child welfare systems will be studied in addition to treatment and prevention aspects of the child abuse issue. 3 credits.

SOWK 405 Military Social Work

The purpose of this course is to understand the military culture within which military families function, the stressors such as deployment that they navigate, and the diversity of military family structures and how a range of diversity filters can impact the military family and military culture. The different military contexts (i.e., active duty, guard/reserve, veteran) are explored. Ethical issues for working in this environment are considered. Theory-based and research-informed strategies to intervene with military families are reviewed. Military family policies are examined and critiqued. Family life cycle interactions with the military demands are discussed. Students completing this course will have a more in-depth understanding of and ability to work with the military and the military families that are a vital part of society. Online only. 3 credits.

SOWK 408 International Social Work

This course introduces the major concepts, theories, and issues of international social work practice. The history, values, ethics, and practice of social work are discussed in a global context that examines the role of the social work profession on an international level. Students will explore issues of human rights, sustainability, community building, and development as they apply a social work perspective to international social work issues at the individual, group, and societal level while considering the role of social workers as advocates in a global society. Online only. 3 credits.

SOWK 418 Social Policy

Prerequisite: SOWK 304.

This course examines the nature and impact of social welfare policies and the role of social workers in influencing social policy. Students will analyze the developmental stages of social policy- from identifying need to implementation, and consider the social, political, and economic context of policy development. The role of ideology in social policy and the impact of policies on individuals, groups, and society will be addressed, with particular attention given to oppressed and vulnerable populations. Students will analyze social policies in the areas of homelessness, poverty, mental health, discrimination, and others. 3 credits.

SOWK 421 Social Work Practice: Individuals and Families

Prerequisite: SOWK 302.

This course introduces students to a conceptual framework and a core set of interpersonal helping skills for generalist practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities. This course focuses on the common knowledge, values, and skills which underlie social work practice with diverse client systems in diverse practice settings and community contexts. 3 credits.

SOWK 422 Social Work Practice: Groups

Prerequisite: SOWK 302.

This course complements the knowledge, values, and skill base found in Social Work Practice: Individual & Families. It is focused on micro assessment and intervention skills, as well as covering the steps of the problem solving process in working with groups. The class focuses on the dynamics of task and process groups. Students learn how to apply a systematic approach to the development, implementation, termination, and evaluation of groups. 3 credits.

SOWK 423 Social Work Practice: Organizations and Communities

Prerequisite: SOWK 302.

This course presents the basics of professional generalist social work practice as it has developed in response to the needs of multiple member systems and communities. Included are methods of practice used to mobilize people to collective action to solve their own problems, form ongoing organizations that enhance their power to meet their own needs, and develop resources where none exist. Emphasis is on work with diverse human populations and the importance of evaluation in practice. The systems perspective is used as an integrating theme throughout. 3 credits.

SOWK 445 Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Social Work

This course introduces the major theories, issues, and treatment approaches related to drug and alcohol abuse. Students examine perspectives on the causes, effects, context, and unique treatment needs of different populations. An historical and multicultural perspective is introduced to examine the origins and social context of substance use and abuse. The role of social work and social workers in addressing drug and alcohol issues is explored as well as societal attitudes and policy approaches to this issue. A social work perspective is applied to understanding and responding to the issues of drug and alcohol use, abuse, and consequences for individuals, families, and societies. Online only. 3 credits.

SOWK 482 Social Work with Older Adults

This course introduces students to age-specific issues involved in assessing and providing services to older adults in social work. Students review physical, psycho-social, and cultural characteristics of aging men and women. They also evaluate assessment and service-delivery strategies and models designed for diverse client populations. Students will study aging from a person-in-environment approach that examines the characteristics of aging as well as attitudes towards aging, societal responses to meeting the needs of older adults, and the role of social workers as advocates for older adults. 3 credits.

SOWK 493 Social Work Practicum Seminar I

Prerequisite: Successful completion of any nine courses (core requirements and/or electives) in the BA in Social Work major, including SOWK 300, 302, 303, 304, 306, 307, and 421; completion of readiness review with the Social Work Field Director, and permission of Field Director.

Students may take SOWK 493 only during the following sessions: Fall-I, Fall-II, Summer-I, Summer-II. This is a required course in the BA in Social Work program and serves as a capstone experience in the program. The course comprises a university-based seminar component and an agency-based field component, which complement each other. Students must participate in a seminar course to be in field practicum. The field practicum and the integrating seminar enable students to integrate knowledge acquired across the social work curriculum with practice in an agency. Through analysis in the seminar of their experiences in the field, students' understanding of previously learned material is deepened and further knowledge acquired. Required readings provide additional content on specific practice topics addressed in the seminar. Practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 494 Social Work Practicum Seminar II

Prerequisite: Successful completion of any nine courses (core requirements and/or electives) in the BA in Social Work major, including SOWK 300, 302, 303, 304, 306, 307, and 421; successful completion of SOWK 493.

This is a required course in the BA in Social Work program and serves as a capstone experience in the program. The course comprises a university-based seminar component and an agency-based field component, which complement each other. Students must participate in a seminar course to be in field practicum. The field practicum and the integrating seminar enable students to integrate knowledge acquired across the social work curriculum with practice in an agency. Through analysis in the seminar of their experiences in the field, students' understanding of previously learned material is deepened and further knowledge acquired. Required readings provide additional content on specific practice topics addressed in the seminar. Practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 495 Social Work Practicum Seminar III

Prerequisite: Successful completion of any nine courses (core requirements and/or electives) in the BA in Social Work major, including SOWK 300, 302, 303, 304, 306, 307, and 421; successful completion of SOWK 494.

This is a required course in the BA in Social Work program, and serves as a capstone experience in the program. The course comprises a university-based seminar component and an agency-based field component, which complement each other. Students must participate in a seminar course to be in field practicum. The field practicum and the integrating seminar enable students to integrate knowledge acquired across the social work curriculum with practice in an agency. Through analysis in the seminar of their experiences in the field, students' understanding of previously learned material is deepened and further knowledge acquired. Required readings provide additional content on specific practice topics addressed in the seminar. Practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 497 Social Work Undergraduate Practicum Continuation

Prerequisites: Enrollment in SOWK 493, SOWK 494, and SOWK 495.

This course allows students to complete the required 400 practicum hours, when the hours have not been completed by the end of the session in which a student is enrolled in SOWK 495. Please see Tuition and Fees section of the catalog for the corresponding Social Work Undergraduate Practicum Continuation fee. This course is graded on a pass/no-pass basis. This course may be repeated. 0 credits.

SOWK 499 Independent Study

Prerequisites: Instructor's approval and approval of petition.

Directed reading and/or research designed to meet specific needs of superior upper division students. 1-3 credits.

SOWK 501 Human Behavior and the Social Environment

In this course students will explore the multiple dimensions (Person, Environment, Time) of individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities and the systems in which they exist. The multi-dimensional approach and theories of human behavior will be presented from a global perspective. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools needed to understand patterns in person-environment interactions (client social functioning, environment, mental health, and physical health) to assess clients from a holistic perspective. 3 credits.

SOWK 502 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families

This course will assist students in acquiring a broad repertoire of skills and knowledge for beginning, generalist, social work practice. Students will learn about the specific steps in the problem-solving process: engagement, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination and follow-up. The course will present a multi-dimensional (Person, Environment, Time), holistic perspective with which to view client issues, building upon the strengths of individuals and families. Course content will include exercises to assist students with understanding themselves and with identifying interpersonal skills in the context of a helping relationship. 3 credits.

SOWK 503 Social Work Practice with Groups, Communities, and Organizations

Prerequisite: SOWK 502.

This course assists students in acquiring a broad repertoire of skills and knowledge for beginning generalist social work practice. Students will demonstrate ethical decisions making, describe how to use reflection and self-regulation, demonstrate professional demeanor, describe how to use technology, and identify evidence-based practice while working with groups, communities, and organizations. This course will challenge students to collect and organize data, synthesize knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, assess and evaluate interventions, and select evaluation methods in working with groups, communities, and organizations. 3 credits.

SOWK 504 Diversity and Social Justice

This course is a foundation course designed to help students increase their understanding about diversity and difference in social work practice. This course develops students' evaluation of how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience concerning identity formation. Theoretical frameworks on diversity and social justice are compared for effective assessment of macro and micro social work issues. Students will analyze intersectionality, societal privilege, and its impact on marginalized populations. 3 credits.

SOWK 505 Social Welfare Policy Analysis

In this course students will examine social policies and methods of policy analysis. Human behavior, historical, social, economic, and evaluation models will be considered in evaluating policies. Students will apply strategies and skills used in policy practice to formulate, advocate for, and analyze social policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice. 3 credits.

SOWK 506 Policy Practice and Advocacy

This course introduces the role of policy practice and advocacy in social work. Students will apply a theoretical framework at each level of social work practice to assist clients in meeting their needs. Issues of social, economic, and environmental justice are considered as students advocate for policies that meet client needs and advance human rights. Policy issues explored include health care, gerontology, safety-net, child and family, education, immigration/global, mental health, and criminal justice. 3 credits.

SOWK 507 Social Work Research

This course introduces students to research methods for the purpose of inspiring an appreciation and application of the concepts to social work practice. Students learn to conceptualize research problems, review relevant literature, and critique existing research. Students design a theoretical study on a topic of their choosing. The study proposal teaches students about research design, creating hypotheses, conceptualization and operationalizing variables, sampling, data collection and analysis, limitations in research and how to use findings to inform future research and practice. Students gain an understanding of cultural competence, ethical considerations, and social work values relating research. 3 credits.

SOWK 593 Social Work Practicum Seminar I

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 505.

Prerequisites: Completion of SOWK 502 and SOWK 503 with a letter grade of B or higher.

Students may take SOWK 593 only during the following sessions: Fall-I, Summer-I. Social Work Practicum Seminar I is the first part of a course series representing the signature pedagogy of social work education. This course is required for all MSW standard program students. The weekly seminar is the university-based complement to the agency-based field course. The joint field practicum and seminar course enables student to integrate knowledge acquired across the social work curriculum within an agency setting. Students apply generalist practice knowledge, skills and values, along with course competencies in practice with vulnerable and diverse populations. Analysis of the field experience in seminar class promotes knowledge acquisition and increases students understanding of previously learned material. Course assignments and supplemental readings provide important content on specific practice topics addressed in seminar. Practicum Courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 594 Social Work Practicum Seminar II

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 506.

Prerequisites: Completion of SOWK 502 and SOWK 503 with a letter grade of B or higher; Successful completion of SOWK 593 and SOWK 505.

Social Work Practicum Seminar II is the second part of a course series representing the signature pedagogy of social work education. This course is required for all MSW standard program students. The weekly seminar is the university-based complement to the agency-based field course. The joint field practicum and seminar course enables student to integrate knowledge acquired across the social work curriculum within an agency setting. Students continue to apply generalist practice knowledge, skills and values, along with course competencies in practice with vulnerable and diverse populations. On-going analysis of the field experience in seminar class deepens knowledge acquisition and increases students understanding of previously learned material. Course assignments and supplemental readings provide important content on specific practice topics addressed in seminar. Practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 595 Social Work Practicum Seminar III

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 507.

Prerequisites: Completion of SOWK 502 and SOWK 503 with a letter grade of B or higher; Successful completion of SOWK 593 and 594 and SOWK 505 and 506.

Social Work Practicum Seminar III is the final part of a course series representing the signature pedagogy of social work education. This course is required for all MSW standard program students. The weekly seminar is the university-based complement to the agency-based field course. The joint field practicum and seminar course enables student to integrate knowledge acquired across the social work curriculum within an agency setting. Students finalize application of advanced generalist practice knowledge, skills and values, along with course competencies in practice with vulnerable and diverse populations. Evaluation of the field experience is summarized in seminar class to distinguish learned knowledge acquisition and conclude students understanding of previously learned material. Course assignments and supplemental readings provide important content on specific practice topics addressed in seminar. Practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. (Not offered until 2019-2020.) 3 credits.

SOWK 597 Social Work Practicum Continuation

Prerequisites: Enrollment in SOWK 593, SOWK 594, and SOWK 595.

This course allows students to complete the required 400 practicum hours, when the hours have not been completed by the end of the session in which a student is enrolled in SOWK 595. Please see Tuition and Fees section of the catalog for the corresponding Graduate-level Practicum Continuation fee. This course is graded on a pass/no-pass basis. This course may be repeated. 0 credits.

SOWK 601 Family Violence

Prerequisite: Advanced standing or successful completion of all 500-level core social work courses.

Prerequisite or co-requisite for SOWK 694. This course will focus on the causes, prevalence, treatment, and prevention of violence that individuals may encounter when working with families. It will provide a historical approach to the issue of violence, the various frameworks needed to understand it and the domestic trends that both promote and hinder it. The course will maintain a dual focus on victims and perpetrators of crime and how they interact with social and economic justice issues. The course will assist students to explore the impact of violence on vulnerable groups such as children, women, the elderly, mentally ill, minority groups, and other special populations. Topics will include child maltreatment, domestic violence, courtship violence, and abuse of the elderly and disabled. The course will help students to develop a culturally competent view of the impact of violence upon individuals and families. Students will learn about violence prevention and intervention strategies that may be used in practice, programming, policy, and research. 3 credits.

SOWK 602 Social Work Law and Ethics

Prerequisite: Advanced standing or successful completion of all 500-level core Social Work courses.

Prerequisite or co-requisite for SOWK 695. This course will prepare students to navigate through the ethical situations social workers encounter in practice. Students develop the necessary skills to assess and manage potential conflicts of interest, ethical dilemmas, cultural differences, and difficult choices related to personal values. Student will also learn social work professional ethical standards, and laws related to the profession of social work. Students will analyze how human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. 3 credits.

SOWK 603 Social Work and Human Sexuality

Prerequisite: Advanced standing or successful completion of all 500 - level core social work courses.

This course will present a multi-dimensional, holistic perspective where students will examine the area of human sexuality. This course will examine the physiological-psychological and social-cultural variables associated with sexual identity, sexual behavior, and sexual disorders. In addition, students will demonstrate insight into personal biases and values. Students will also apply evidence-based, apply knowledge to the areas of sexuality theories, gender and gender identity, sexual orientation, healthy sexual relationships and sexuality across the lifespan, sexual health, and laws, values, and ethics within the area of sexuality. 3 credits.

SOWK 622 Advanced Generalist Practice

Prerequisite: Advanced standing or successful completion of all 500 - level core social work courses.

Prerequisite or co-requisite for SOWK 693. This course offers an overarching ecological strengths-based systems approach that will prepare students for advanced social work generalist practice. Students will integrate research, values, and ethics, apply diversity and difference, examine theoretical foundations, and evaluate policy practice. In addition, students will be challenged to address the advancement of human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice. Students will also obtain training in substance abuse including how to define alcoholism and chemical dependency, medical and legal aspects of substance abuse, examination of theories, treatment approaches, and exploration of community resources. 3 credits.

SOWK 625 Practice Evaluation

Prerequisite: Advanced standing or successful completion of all 500 - level core social work courses.

Prerequisite or co-requisite for SOWK 696. Practice evaluation is an essential part of providing evidence-based service delivery to clients. This course introduces students to single-subject and single-case study design. Students learn the relationship between single-subject research and practice and why it is important to evaluate our work. The elements of research design, basic data analysis techniques and the skills needed to complete a thorough literature review are reviewed as well. Students learn how to work with clients as partners to obtain data for research purposes and how to communicate research results to clients. 3 credits.

SOWK 630 Child Welfare

This course prepares social work students for research- and evidence-based, culturally competent, family-focused, strengths-based, and outcome-oriented child welfare practice. The goal is to familiarize students with the scope and practice of services that are available to help children and families. This course will review the evolution of public child welfare policies and services, the major child welfare federal and state laws, and the theories about the causes, prevention, and treatment of child maltreatment. The focus of this course will be on critical issues facing families in our society including ethnic and cultural issues. This course will explore best practices in the field. 3 credits.

SOWK 631 Social Work Practice with Adolescents

This course will prepare students to conduct social work practice with adolescents. Students will demonstrate understanding of adolescent development, examine theories applied to teenagers, and interpret policy, ethical considerations, and cultural competence skills specifically related to teenagers. Students will develop and recommend assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills that directly apply to the adolescent population with a focus on addressing specific adolescent challenges such as substance abuse, sexual identity issues, risky behavior, sexual behavior, delinquency, and mental health issues. 3 credits.

SOWK 632 Prevention and Intervention in Child Abuse and Neglect

In this course, students will examine the causes and effects of child maltreatment and use this information to understand and develop effective prevention, intervention, and evaluation strategies. Information in this course will include assessment, intervention, and prevention strategies that can be used by social workers in a variety of settings to intervene, treat, and prevent child abuse and neglect. Implications for public policy and the development, provision, funding, and implementation of social programs and services will be presented. 3 credits.

SOWK 633 Children and Adolescent Policy

This course will prepare students to define, examine, and evaluate complex children and adolescent policies. Students will closely inspect how policy impacts practice with youth, families, and communities. The focus of this course will engage students in investigating federal policies that surround the areas of diversity, trauma, abuse, health care, mental health, education, welfare, child protection, delinquency, and homelessness. This course will also challenge students to support advocacy for social policies; recommend ethical decision making; assess oppression, discrimination, and historical trauma; determine evidence-based practices; and evaluate effectiveness of current policy impacting children and adolescents. 3 credits.

SOWK 634 Family Policy

This course will prepare students to define, examine, and evaluate complex family policy. Students will discover historical context, ethical constructs, issues of diversity and difference, effects of oppression, discrimination and trauma within family policy. This course will engage students to examine evidence-based practice, how policies address the areas of social programs, marriage, reproduction, parenting, childcare, employment, multi-generational families, health care, family poverty, violence, and intergenerational incarceration. Students will also be challenged to evaluate the effectiveness of current family policy. 3 credits.

SOWK 650 Crisis Intervention and Trauma Response

This course will provide crucial information for assessing and reacting to various crises involving suicide, homicide, intimate partner violence, sexual violence, sexual abuse, bereavement/grief, substance use, natural disasters, wars, emergency response in the community and in schools, and terrorism. Practical applications and policy implications for various crisis situations will be presented. The crisis task model will be used to process crisis situations, understand crucial information about a crisis, clinical considerations, and practical experiences on every crisis topic. Safety issues, self-care, and wellness will also be examined. 3 credits.

SOWK 651 Social Work Response to Disasters

Vulnerable populations such as children, older adults, and people with disabilities are disproportionately affected by large-scale disasters. This course will address the specific psychosocial needs of vulnerable populations after a disaster and related policy implications. Best practices for crisis intervention with specific populations including children, older adults, people with disabilities, people with mental health issues, and people with substance abuse issues will be discussed. A theoretical foundation for understanding disasters, response systems, common guidelines for preparedness, and basic crisis theory will be presented. 3 credits.

SOWK 652 Military/Veteran (SMVF) Social Work

This course is intended to establish a social work construct regarding military culture, policy, history, tradition, structure, customs, and ethical dilemmas for social workers. Students will learn to contrast cultural nuances between the military community at large and each military branch. Students will differentiate the therapeutic needs of SMVF (Service Members, Veterans, and their Families) populations compared to civilian populations. This course will allow students to develop the necessary knowledge to demonstrate military-specific cultural differences into their assessments, professional practice, and evaluations. 3 credits.

SOWK 653 Social Work Practice with SMVF Populations

This course will examine issues surrounding parenting and relationships in service members, veterans, and their families (SMVF). Military lifecycle issues are examined using a lifespan development model and includes issues such as family stress and resilience and domestic violence. The changing needs of older and aging veterans are explored. Related ethics and ethical issues are enumerated. 3 credits.

SOWK 654 Death, Loss and Grief

In this course students will identify the different types of loss experienced by individuals throughout the life cycle and evaluate evidence-based interventions that social workers can implement to address grief related needs. Issues of cultural diversity and norms, gender, social variation in the grief experience, and developmental life stages are considered. Resilience, growth, and the capacities of individuals and families confronted with loss are also examined. Through readings, discussion, and application of the course material to social work practice situations, students will explore theoretical and practice approaches to understanding and addressing issues related to death, loss, and grief. Policy implications are addressed. 3 credits.

SOWK 655 Substance Abuse

This course prepares social work students to employ techniques for substance abuse prevention, screening, assessment, and treatment, and evaluation of persons with alcohol and other drug-related problems. The impact of substance abuse upon the behavioral, psychosocial, physical, spiritual and social aspects of the individual, family, and community is interpreted. Students will be prepared for the implementation of effective substance abuse interventions, treatment planning, and policy recommendations. 3 credits.

SOWK 656 Sexual Abuse

This course will provide a comprehensive exploration of definitions, scope, and influence of sexual abuse on individuals through a micro, mezzo, and macro lens. This trauma-informed course is designed to prepare students for the assessment, treatment and evaluation of all ranges of sexual abuse in society. Effective practice includes the ability to employ a strength-based perspective in a professional context to address sexual abuse. Current trends in treatment of sexual abuse are investigated along with applicable policy issues. 3 credits.

SOWK 657 Mental Health and Mental Illness

This course is designed to prepare students for working with adults diagnosed with mental illness in institutional and community settings. Using the social work perspective, students gain an understanding of mental well-being and illness in relation to the person-in-environment and other relevant classification systems as well as pertinent social policy issues. The course emphasizes the critical influence of culture, class, race and ethnicity, religion, and social values of the individual, family, group, and social institutions in the assessment of client strengths and vulnerabilities. Students learn to conduct mental status evaluations, perform differential diagnosis using the DSM-5, formulate a collaborative goals and intervention plan, and evaluate outcomes. 3 credits.

SOWK 693 Advanced Social Work Practicum Seminar I

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 622.

Prerequisites: Advanced Standing status or successful completion of all 500-level MSW required courses; successful completion of all advanced fieldwork application requirements listed in the catalog; and permission of Director of Field or MSW Assistant Director of Field Education Students may take SOWK 693 only during the following sessions: Fall-I, Spring-I, Summer-I.

MSW students complete their field placement practicum at social service agencies within their geographic area. Advanced Social Work Practicum Seminar I is the first part of a course series that allows student practitioners the opportunity to build upon, apply, and integrate advanced classroom training and evidence-based interventions within a practice setting. MSW students gather direct practice experience working with diverse populations, and increase opportunities, resources, and capacity for local agencies that provide direct services to vulnerable families and communities. Advanced practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 694 Advanced Social Work Practicum Seminar II

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 601.

Prerequisites: Advanced Standing status or completion of all 500-level MSW required courses; successful completion of SOWK 693; and approval to continue advanced social work practicum seminar by the Director of Field or MSW Assistant Director of Field Education.

Advanced Social Work Practicum Seminar II is the second part of a course series that allows student practitioners the opportunity to build upon, apply, and integrate advanced classroom training and evidence-based interventions within a practice setting. In this course, students continue to work at their field placement site, and continue to demonstrate advanced practice related skills. MSW students demonstrate enhanced direct practice experience working with diverse populations, and increase opportunities, resources, and capacity for local agencies that provide direct services to vulnerable families and communities. Advanced practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 695 Advanced Social Work Practicum Seminar III

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 602.

Prerequisites: Advanced Standing status or completion of all 500-level MSW required courses; successful completion of SOWK 693 and SOWK 694; and approval to continue advanced social work practicum seminar by the Director of Field or MSW Assistant Director of Field Education.

Advanced Social Work Practicum Seminar III is the third part of a course series that allows student practitioners the opportunity to build upon, apply, and integrate advanced classroom training and evidence-based interventions within a practice setting. In this course, students continue work at their fieldwork site, and demonstrate competency of practice related skills learned during prior fieldwork courses. MSW students continue to synthesize direct practice experience working with diverse populations, and increase opportunities, resources, and capacity for local agencies that provide direct services to vulnerable families and communities. Advanced practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 696 Advanced Social Work Practicum Seminar IV

Prerequisite or Corequisite SOWK 625.

Prerequisites: Advanced Standing status or completion of all 500-level MSW required courses; successful completion of SOWK 693, SOWK 694 and SOWK 695; and approval to continue advanced social work practicum seminar by the Director of Field or MSW Assistant Director of Field Education.

Advanced Field Practicum Seminar IV is the final part of a course series that allows student practitioners the opportunity to build upon, apply, and integrate advanced classroom training and evidence-based interventions within a practice setting. In this course, students finalize work at their fieldwork site, and demonstrate mastery of advanced practice skills learned throughout the fieldwork experience. MSW students demonstrate competency in direct practice experience working with diverse populations, and increase opportunities, resources, and capacity for local agencies that provide direct services to vulnerable families and communities. Advanced practicum courses are to be taken consecutively. Graded pass/no-pass. 3 credits.

SOWK 697 Social Work Advanced Practicum Continuation

Prerequisites: Enrollment in SOWK 693, SOWK 694, SOWK 695, and SOWK 696.

This course allows students to complete the required 600 advanced practicum hours, when the hours have not been completed by the end of the session in which a student is enrolled in SOWK 696. Please see Tuition and Fees section of the catalog for the corresponding Graduate-level Practicum Continuation fee. This course is graded on a pass/no-pass basis. This course may be repeated. 0 credits.

SOWK 699 Independent Study

Prerequisites: Instructor's approval and approval of petition.

Advanced supervised independent study or research on a special problem or in a selected area. Online only. 1-3 credits.